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in 2009. taliban will be given a seat at table and allowed to open an office in qatar. the taliban must first renounce terrorism. >> bret: we talked about what the troop number will be at the end of 2014. what is the going thinking on that. what about the concern about protecting those troops if the number is very low? >> well, absolutely. what we have confirmed is general john allen, the top commanderrer in afghanistan given the national security team around the president three options. 9,000 option, 6,000 option. and 3,000 option. the president will likely decide on 3,000 to 6,000 troops and that will not give you much option in terms of the training and assisting the afghanistan security forces. they will set up bases to deal with al-qaeda if fringe area along the border. >> bret: we'll follow it. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. thank you. do you think the president should speed up the process of having afghan take control of the security? let me know on twitter. to me at bret baier. the politics, west virginia senator rockefeller will not seek a sixth term. the leader of the congr
to shape where the taliban goes because, of course, its internal issue is that the afghan taliban began to actually seed and grow in insurgency inside pakistan that they had to deal with, and i think that's fundamental. the troops on the ground don't necessarily help us solve that problem. other issues, money and other elements of state, will help us influence pakistan. >> what do we know about conversations between the karzai regime and the taliban, the negotiations in france? >> well, president karzai during our interview said that they are currently still in negotiations and talking to the taliban, but there hasn't been any proof that they actually have been because the taliban themselves they send emails and talk to us on the phone as journalists and they tell us that in no way will they talk to what they call the puppet regime of america, referring to president karzai in his government, but the afghan officials that we speak to, they say that they are currently talking to the taliban, but they may be. we just don't know what level of the taliban that they're talking to. >> i know t
decided security would be an afghan responsibility in the aftermath of the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we had successfully built for the war and for the peace conference to disintegrate. iran had been very helpful. week rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least then not actively and helpful. but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were a certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be cooperative, that would have collaborated. instead, we sent them to guantanamo, and sent a negative signal to those who might consider who being coopted into the new system. it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems, and despite the fact that now, more than 10 years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign in afghanistan, i think we have come a longer way than many of us realize. some of this is
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
name malvi, a taliban commander. as far as i could tell, it was a perfectly legal and good thing to do, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in t
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
the taliban out of their holds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure than insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges. but because this progress, our transition is on track. at the n.a.t.o. summit last year, we agreed with our coalition partners that after beg afghan forces in 2013. the president has been here and we've consulted with coalition partners and continue to do so. today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalitions forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight alongside afghan forces as needed, but starting this spring our troops will have a different mission, training, advising, assi
weeks with u.s. special forces hunting taliban militants. good afternoon. >> hi, how are you doing? >> shepard: he blames us for everything. why in the world would the president talk to him? >> you have to watch his game. he is looking forward to releasing all of the 3,000 or so prisoners while u.s. forces are busy putting them in jail. he knows he will not get the north so he decided to bring the taliban back into the government. these things won't be discussed too openly as he begs president obama to keep troops there and i think he will have to relent on the u.s. troops being is subject to afghan law because we will just pull out of there. >> shepard: the goal has been the most recent goal in a series of goals in afghanistan has been to put afghan security forces back in charge of things. you have are been over there for five weeks looking at it. how is that going? >> very badly. the army and the police are one of the main problems they have because they are causing problems in the more remote regions. when i was there we had a group of u.s. trained afghan police battling u.s. t
: there is another headline out of this too, jennifer, that's talks with the taliban. >> after 11 years of war, the afghan president announced today from the white house the taliban will be given a seat at the table. >> we agreed on allowing the taliban office in qatar. >> president obama issued a caveat. the taliban must renounce terrorism. the president diverted attention from those asking whether 11 years of war were worth it by announcing today army staff sergeant clinton romesha who helped repel one of the most vicious attacks in eastern afghanistan in 2009 would receive the medal of honor, shepard. >> shepard: first you kill the taliban and then you have him in for talks. fascinating. 2013. jen griffin at the pentagon. thanks. john boehner formally invited the president to deliver his first state of the union of his second term the date february 12th. he has to be invited, you know. the president hats accepted the date which also happens to be abraham lincoln's birthday it will touch on immigration reform spending and gun control. in a letter to the president speaker boehner wrote our na
troops would weaken the negotiating position about those negotiations with the taliban ever got started again. now, the taliban, that's been one of their demands. all u.s. troops leave afghanistan after 2014. and there are some who feel the white house 234r0floated this io sort of, you know, lay the ground work to get some perhaps concessions on some other issues that are important to the white house. in other words, more of a negotiati negotiati negotiating ploy. >> it's been a tense relationship on many occasions. be interesting to know how this meeting goes in that regard. also he's the guy they have to deal with. he's the only player they really can deal with. but the reality is he still doesn't run much of afghanistan in the real world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the gene
the taliban and has been if that is a friend who needs an enemy kind and a half. today the white house to talk about our nation's longest war. specifically when and how we will get out of there finally. that is the question from many afghans. but the president of afghanistan wants to talk about the circumstances. so they will and we will report in just a moment. this s "studio b." and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. >> shepard: the former governor of new mexico bill richardson is back in the united states after he made a trip to north korea with the google chairman eric schmidt. the state department criticized the visit as unhelpful and basically told they don't go but they went anyway. they pushed nort north north kp missile launches and nuclear tests and called on the regime to allow more cell phones and internet access. he also said he asked for fair and humane treatment for an american citizen detained in north korea. he joins us now. also the former energy secretary a
billion for them to be due to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic increase -- a decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. $4,000,000,000.5000000000 dollars for them to continue to host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a draw on strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. babalu remain a threat in that area for the force -- that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the worl
the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and that you cannot resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that a about 3 -- we believe that about every country in the world. we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution as protection for minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghanistan's long term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will poli
with a helicopter pilots while this is going on and watch the gunbattle that went on between the taliban and enforcement on the ground. i got the story and essentially i was -- i agreed with the public affairs people in kandahar that it was time for me to get out of kandahar and go back to kabul and eventually the united states. so it was a very intense experience for me and very strange. week got rocketed in kandahar and i'm trying to write a blogpost about general detritus and rockets, knocked the power out. i got on the first military flight and usually it's really hard to get on a military flight. this was pretty easy. they put me on a flight ready quickly and all the soldiers had copies printed out of the story. i had never seen anything like it. c-span: how did they treat you? >> guest: they treated me well. almost everyone, there were a few exceptions but most people in the military have always treated me with respect. c-span: what would you tell somebody that wanted to do the same thing you have done? i mean, what should they expect? talk some more about the reporters in the esta
with the afghan taliban. drones have always been deeply unpopular with pakistanis because of civilian deaths because. now general stanley mcchrystal, in charge of forces in afghanistan, cautions about their overuse. but president obama has just named john brenan as the one he wants to run the cia and he has been one of the strongest advocates of drawn attacks as obama's counterterrorism chief. now more from the pakistani capital islamabad. >> the pakistani establishment have said the drone strikes are counterproductive because there is collateral damage. that collateral damage has now been established by the bureau of investigative journalism and the stanford report. so there is considerable criticism about the legality of those strikes. john brenan had already said there was no collateral damage in the drone strikes, something that is documented. the pakistanis are warning that it will jeopardize their own counterinsurgency strategies in the tribal areas. peace talks to stop the fighting in the central african republic have been delayed until the end of the week. meanwhile, thousands of peo
strikes this year including the one that took out the taliban commander, the dep te a eight others in pakistan. the u.s. war on terror grown reliant on the unmanned vehicles that are prepared for flight an armed with the hell fire missiles. >> i believe john brennan taking over at c.i.a. will ensure that the drone program will comet. the administration has been -- and brennan particular, selling us on the fact that drones is the magic weapon. >> bret: >> reporter: president bam banal herted the drones from the predecessor. despite his criticism of bush, he has empanded the program employing agilities to authorize 300 drone strikes that killed # ,500 people. it has long strangeed relakes with pakistan and civilian who complain about the civilian casualties. >> we endeavor to redouse zillian casualties as much as possible. -- civilian casualties as much as possible. taking the fight to al-qaeda made the united states safer. >> worked to embed evidents to a strong legal frame wok. >> civil bi liberty groups. >> the u.s. government is using drones far from the battlefield to kill peopl
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
attacked by taliban gun men malala is being discharged. she was shot in the head for speaking out advocating education for pakistani girls. the 15-year-old now an international symbol of courage. an amazing story of recovery there. >>> his term in the house is over but barney frank could be back on capitol hill. the lawmaker told msnbc he asked to be appointed as a temporary senator if john kerry becomes secretary of state. frank says he wants to be a part of the looming battle over the debt ceiling but says he has no interest in running for the position permanently. >>> let's see if you can spot the difference between the two photos. one of the photos released by nancy pelosi's office and the other shows who is standing on the capitol hill. it is obvious that four congress women have been photo shopped into the picture. pelosi asked if she considered it an accurate historical record today. >> it is active of who the democratic women of congress are and it was freezing cold and our members had been waiting a long time for everyone to arrive and had to get back into the building to
's robust. give me a number. >> to protect against al qaeda and the taliban. i think in the 15 to 20,000 range. depends on what military commanders say. the worst possible solution is have a small footprint left behind in afghanistan where they become sitting ducks and it will lead to failure. we fought too long and too hard not to get this right. his decision about a post-2014 force will affect our national security interests for decades, and would i like to support the president in it's a robust number. >> let me move you on finally to what's going on on capitol hill on the domestic side, and that is this debt ceiling that will need to be raised sometime in february. where are you on the idea of a partial or a full government shutdown to stop the spending in order to get some cuts in exchange for republicans raising the debt ceiling. >> i believe we need to raise the debt ceiling, but if we don't raise it without a plan to get out of debt, all of us should be fired. every american owes $52,000 in terms of their share of the national debt. we've raised the debt ceiling last august.
negotiating power with the taliban. >> the position we take in showing that we are going to continue to complete this mission, the better the chances we have to ultimately achieve political reconciliation. >> the pentagon was only the beginning of the afghan president's visit to washington. >> our meeting, i believe, helped -- will help lay the ground work for president karzai's discussions tomorrow with president obama. >> sources say president karzai and his defense minister brought a wish list to the pentagon, drones, helicopters, and hardware to support their security forces. >> what we talked about yesterday was, you know, let's move beyond a wish list of equipment. >> the u.s. want assurances the terrorists won't set up troops in afghanistan after the troops leave. karzai agreed. >> be able to provide security to these people. >> but a recent pentagon reports that the afghan border patrol relies on the u.s. for even its most basic needs, food and water. it's rife with illiteracy, lack of accountability, and corruption. and these conditions are expected to endure beyond 2014. bu
at the "morning papers." "the washington post." the cia has started off 2013 by using drones to bomb taliban targets in pakistan on 7 of the last 10 days. analysts say the uptick in air attacks is a move to weaken the taliban's hold on the region ahead of coalition troop withdrawals in 2014. >>> and "the washington post," the pentagon is preparing for a worst-case scenario in which lawmakers failed to make its march 1st deadline on the budget deal. that would mean deep, across-the-board cuts including $500 million less for the defense department. leon panetta says it would be a huge setback for national security. >>> "the wall street journal," american express is set to cut 5,400 jobs. the company will slash 8.5% of its staff, mostly from its travel division which has lost business in the advent of internet travel sites. >>> this weekend's "parade" magazine, it's the savings issue. inside, a guide to saving $10,000 this year. >> did you hear that? you can save money. >> that's a good investment because that "parade" doesn't cost that much. so you can save. that's kind of a no-brainer. >> the
on a billiards hall in southwest pakistan. a sunni militant group with ties to the pakistani taliban is claiming responsibility for the bombings. >>> new this morning, an apparent hostage situation inside a los angeles mall that's still going on. l.a. police say two armed men somehow got into a mall at lax about two hours after closing last night. they believe they may be holding a woman hostage inside a nordstrom rack store. overnight workers were evacuated there. the situation closed part of the 405 freeway for a time. it's reopened. >>> during a week of talks aimed at ending gun violence, gunfire rings out at another school. a student shot one classmate and tried to shoot another in taft, california. police say the boy had been targeted students who bullied him. a teacher prevented more bloodshed by talking the student into putting the gun down. the injured student is in critical but stable condition. >> today's gun control talks will focus on the video game industry. the entertainment software association which represents several major video game makers has confirmed it will attend. vice pre
militant group with ties to the pakistani taliban claiming responsibility for the bombings. today we'll learn much more about recent safety problems involving boeing's newest 787 dreamliner. transportation secretary ray lahood and the faa will announce a safety review of the plane. just this week, an electrical fire broke out on one of the planes owned by japan airlines as it arrived in boston. then a fuel leak grounded another plane operated by j.a.l. the same planes fly in and out of dulles every day. >>> fairfax teachers may soon get a raise. school superintendent jack dale unveiled the budget. the plan includes a modest 1% raise for teachers. $63 million would go toward hiring nearly 300 teachers and administrators to deal with an expected jump in enrollment. the school system is expected 2900 new students. dale is asking the county for a 5.5% increase in funding for the coming year. he doesn't expect to receive all money requested based on the economy. >>> 6:35 now. your metro ride will be a little slower on three lines this weekend. the station along the blue line will be close
in afghanistan we're going to help the afghan forces be able to stand up and prevent a taliban takeover. the problem is that if we're not embedded with those afghan forces, we're going to see a big flare-up of civil war in that country again. now, that might be what we have to do. maybe it's too expensive for us to be there, but i don't think president obama is comfortable fully acknowledging the kind of choice we face. if we go with the small troop levels, maybe that's what we need to do. that means we're not going to be able to have the presence that's going to prevent a real breakout of civil war. >> is it possible the president has already indicated what his decision's going to be, not just as he said, the troop levels perceived by the pentagon. but also by choosing chuck hagel as his next defense secretary. >> first of all, remember, the numbers being presented by the pentagon are not necessarily what is coming from the white house. and so we can't simply make that assumption. the generals have their plan, you can have vice president biden others saying, look, let's force people to
's attention because many fear if there are no u.s. troops the country will revert to the taliban you have provided options not to the president yet but to the national security staff. as you know i don't speak about options until i have had a chance to speak to the president. >> at the state department president karzai is dining tonight with secretary clinton and leon panetta. he brought a long list of military equipment that karzai needs from kabul but which what is is increasingly clear whatever u.s. presence there will be in afghanistan after 2014 will be quite small, shepard. >> jenks then there is israel. the israeli defense minister in town in washington and talking about concerns of serious chemical weapons amid that civil war. >> it's interesting, the last time that ehud barak the defense minister was in town in washington at the end the of last year. we started hearing reports that there was new intelligence suggesting that sara ran gas had been mixed and maybe even loaded into weapons inside syria. just two days ago we heard the "new york times" report that that intelligence cam
months after the taliban tried to kill her for advocating education for girls. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year
for afghan women as the taliban returns. i find that a very scary report. >> the other people scared are the pakistanis. >> right. >> looking at what's happening says kroog the border, if we are completely pulling out. what does it say about the surge and the american lives that were lost with that escalation? >> if you look at the pentagon's own most recent report on what's been the last six months in afghanistan, you will -- of the most recent -- the most repeat report from the pentagon on previous six months in afghanist afghanistan, you will see that the levels of violence that have returned to -- are now greater than presurge levels. this obviously brings us to the conclusion that the surge has made no difference. now, the military will disagree with that, and i would say the surge has made a difference in parts of afghanistan, in southern afghanistan, and helmand province especially where 20,000 marines were there. they're leaving soon. it did make a difference to some degree in kandahar, so i think the zero option is partly strategic. it was partly to negotiate with karzai to
not going to work backward from what has been accomplished. we have seriously weakened the taliban. you know, the two remain resilient. we know they're still out there, but we've been able to take the battle to the taliban and prevent them from getting any territory they lost and we're continuing to do that. we are seeing a ansf and afghan military that is increasingly important its ability to be operational. we've gone through a transition areas and above of a 75% of the population of afghanistan and those transitions are working, moving in the right direction and it is the ansf providing the security with regards to all of these areas. in addition to that, we have and removing the fourth tranche in next year will implement the final tranche in this transition. so progress is being made. progress is being made on the battlefield. progress is being made with regards to the society in afghanistan. the house arab afghans is improving. is it everything we want? note. is it everything that we would hope they would be able to achieve in this timeframe? not yet. but we are moving in the right dire
... >>. >> jamie: welcome back. two homicide bombers striking southern afghanistan. five people died. taliban claiming responsibility. police in bangladesh clashing with protestors who are trying to enforce a strike today. that in response to a hike in fuel prices. about two dozen people were injured as police tried to break up the crowd with rubber bullets and tear gas. and jirad showing off his new passport. french actor leaving his homeland in protest against the new tax rates for millionaires. >> gregg: americans suffering from foreclosure crisis are going to have to wait a little longer for relief. house oversight committee are asking to delay a multibillion dollar settlement. joining us to talk about it is brenda buttner. it's a $10 billion deal, 14 banks, five of the largest who gets compensated and how? >> that is part of the issue. we know that $3.75 billion is supposed to be basically paid out in cash to many of people who went through foreclosures in 2009 and 2010. the balance is some sort of release for borrowers. but the regulators can't agree and they are worried that the money
made. we're not going to walk backward from what has been accomplished. we have weakened the taliban. they do remain resilient. we know they are still out there. but we have been able to take the battle to the taliban and prevent them from gaining an -- territory they lost. we are in seeing the afghan military that is improving its ability to be operational. we have now gone through a transition of areas that involve 75% of the population of afghanistan. those transitions are moving in the right direction. and they are providing the primary security with regard to all those areas. in addition to that, we have our and we are moving the fourth tranche and next year we will implement the final one in this transition. progress is being made. progress is being made on the battlefield, with regard to the society in afghanistan, the education and health care of afghans in it -- is improving. is it everything we want? now. is it everything we would hope it would be able to achieve? not yet. but we are moving in the right direction. i think we really have the opportunity to be able to put thi
this is a guaranty for a taliban takeover, resurgence of al qaeda, the sacrifice of everything our troops have won for us over there and as i say, i think this is a question of getting some good negotiators. we could have resolved that program in iraq if we had the will and tenacity to do so. we can do it here in afghanistan as as well. i think it is less a question of what hamid karzai wants but more a question of what barack obama wants or doesn't want. jenna: that is a big question. we heard from general allen reports that he had suggested to the pentagon upwards of wanting 20,000 troops to remain in the country after the end of 2014. what do you think about the fact that this debate, this negotiation, this floating of the idea of the zero option, is happening very much in the public sphere? that we're talking about it now, that it is out in the open rather than behind closed doors, how does that impact things? >> i think this is what the president wants. i don't think he wants to be in afghanistan. forget after 2014. i think he would like to withdraw this year. and i think a lot of numbers abo
in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away like that in these incredibly dangerous and challenging things, i know you worry all the time. certainly every night, i worry. but, you know, he loves doing what he's doing. he's brilliant at it. keep his head down and protecting our troops on the ground. i constantly meet the families of those who have lost their sons or husbands or brothers or sisters. i have some understanding, at least, of what they go through. >> reporter: prince william has also been back at works a rescue helicopter pilot. even on new year's eve and new year's day, risking his own life to save other people. matt? >> all right. mi michelle kosinski at buckingham palace today. michelle, thank you. >>> by the way, we're learning mo r about that never-before-seen photo of diana on friday. >> this was taken before her marriage to prince charles and was marked "not to be published." a lot of people wondered about the man in the picture. adam russell. they wer
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)